PARTNERING OPPORTUNITIES

Do you have a great idea for a funded project, but need an industrial or academic partner? We are here to help….. We can help find you a relevant company or academic to collaborate with on a CBMNet funded project.

Please see below a list of our members who are currently seeking project partners.


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Opportunities to collaborative with academic and industry partners on life sciences project that would benefit from high performance computing

Deadline details: n/a
Website details: 
www.hartree.stfc.ac.uk
Partnering opportunity: The Hartree centre provides collaborative research, innovation and development services that accelerate the application of high performance computing, data science, analytics and cognitive techniques. We help businesses and research partners to gain competitive advantage through projects that enable them to produce better outcomes, products and services, more quickly and cheaply than through conventional R&D. The computational biology group at the Hartree centre are looking for opportunities to collaborate on life sciences research projects in the fields of genomics, bioinformatics, and systems biology that could benefit from high performance computing and data analytics.

For more details please contact us at cbm@shef.ac.uk

 


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Dr Paul Beales, School of Chemistry & Astbury Centre for Structural Molecular Biology, University of Leeds

Deadline details: n/a
Website details: 
http://www.chem.leeds.ac.uk/paul-beales
Partnering opportunity: We are developing novel membrane systems to enhance the durability of reconstituted membrane proteins for biotechnological applications. These membrane vesicles are hybrids materials combining natural and synthetic constituents. We have currently developed reconstitution protocols for cytochrome bo3 ubiquinol oxidase as a model protein and demonstrated that the functional lifetime of the protein is significantly extended when reconstituted in hybrid vesicles: the best performing formulation retains >60% of its initial enzymatic activity after 6 weeks compared with traditional proteoliposomes which are inactive by week 4. This work has been submitted for publication. We are now seeking to extend this study to membrane proteins of interest in biotechnology. We seek partners who would benefit from extending the functional lifetime of a reconstituted membrane protein within their biotechnology application. External funding to support collaborative work could be sought through RCUK project grants, CASE awards and other relevant funding streams.

For more details please contact us at cbm@shef.ac.uk


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Dr Peter Lund, Birmingham Institute of Microbiology and Infection 

Deadline details: n/a
Website details: http://www.birmingham.ac.uk/staff/profiles/biosciences/lund-pete.aspx
Partnering opportunity: E. coli with enhanced tolerance to acid: Evolution in the lab is a powerful method to select for strains of bacteria with desirable properties, and the advent of cheap whole genome sequencing means it’s now also very quick and easy to identify mutations in evolved strains, though it can take a little longer to understand which of the mutations that you find in evolved genomes are responsible for the new properties of the organism. In our group at the University of Birmingham we’re using an evolutionary approach to engineer strains of E coli with enhanced tolerance to low pH – either for survival at very low pH (2.5 or lower) or an enhanced ability to grow at moderately low pH (typically 4.5).  We’ve now succeeded in evolving strains with each of these properties; some of the details are already published here. As might be expected, the mutations we find that endow cells with these two properties are very different, and we’re now looking to see what happens if you combine the two.  Our aim is to understand these strains as part of our research effort on stress networks in bacteria, but we’re also very aware that these strains could have many applications for use in industrial processes where low pH is an issue.  So we’re very keen to talk with companies who think that these strains might help them in developing their processes, with a view to making proposals through suitable national or European routes for joint funding for one or more collaborative projects.

For more details please contact us at cbm@shef.ac.uk


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Andrew Graham, ATG Scientific
Deadline details: 31st December 2015
Website details: www.atgscientific.co.uk
Partnering opportunity: ATG Scientific promotes innovative technologies and techniques for nanomaterial and bioscience research. The Company is looking to introduce and link academic researchers to small specialised industrial overseas partners who are keen to explore new applications and uses for their products. This could, for example, involve spending time on specific projects at a partner’s facility performing measurements and studies which will lead to both an improved understanding of nanoparticle or biological interactions. Anyone with an interest in such a collaboration must be working on research to do with cell biology, biophysics, proteins, lipids, peptides, molecular processes, SAMS, drug delivery and/or nanotoxicology. The overseas partners are internationally recognised experts in their fields and their technologies could lead to further studies or collaborations for the benefit of life science and health developments in the UK.
For more details please contact us at cbm@shef.ac.uk


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Steve Taylor, Celbius Ltd
Deadline details: n/a
Website details: www.celbius.com
Partnering opportunity: Celbius is developing applications of ultrasound in bioprocessing, including biotransformations, fermentations and extraction, with the aim of increasing process reaction rates and yields. Process enhancement is achieved through a number of ways such as intense micro-mixing, and in the case of cells, enhanced membrane transport. Sonic equipment is available for the treatment of liquids and slurries from lab to industrial scale, in batch or continuous mode. The company wishes to broaden the application of ultrasonics in bioprocessing and is interested to talk to other academics or companies who may wish to explore the use of ultrasonics in their projects or processes.

For more details please contact us at cbm@shef.ac.uk