Category Archives: SCIENCE

Analysis of SMALP co-extracted phospholipids shows distinct membrane environments for three classes of bacterial membrane protein

Alvin C. K. Teo, Sarah C. Lee, Naomi L. Pollock, Zoe Stroud, Stephen Hall, Alpesh Thakker, Andrew R. Pitt, Timothy R. Dafforn, Corinne M. Spickett & David I. Roper

Biological characterisation of membrane proteins lags behind that of soluble proteins. This reflects issues with the traditional use of detergents for extraction, as the surrounding lipids are generally lost, with adverse structural and functional consequences. Read more

Enhanced functionalisation of major facilitator superfamily transporters via fusion of C-terminal protein domains is both extensive and varied in bacteria

Benjamin J. Willson, Lindsey Dalzell, Liam N. M. Chapman, Gavin H. Thomas

The evolution of gene fusions that result in covalently linked protein domains is widespread in bacteria, where spatially coupling domain functionalities can have functional advantages in vivo.Fusions to integral membrane proteins are less widely studied but could provide routes to enhance membrane function in synthetic biology. Read more

Restoration of biofuel production levels and increased tolerance under ionic liquid stress is enabled by a mutation in the essential Escherichia coli gene cydC

Thomas Eng, Philipp Demling, Robin A. Herbert, Yan Chen, Veronica Benites, Joel Martin, Anna Lipzen, Edward E. K. Baidoo, Lars M. Blank, Christopher J. Petzold, Aindrila Mukhopadhyay

Background

Microbial production of chemicals from renewable carbon sources enables a sustainable route to many bioproducts. Sugar streams, such as those derived from biomass pretreated with ionic liquids (IL), provide efficiently derived and cost-competitive starting materials. A limitation to this approach is that residual ILs in the pretreated sugar source can be inhibitory to microbial growth and impair expression of the desired biosynthetic pathway.

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Engineering yeast endosymbionts as a step toward the evolution of mitochondria

Angad P. MehtaLubica SupekovaJian-Hua ChenKersi PestonjamaspPaul WebsterYeonjin KoScott C. HendersonGerry McDermottFrantisek Supek, and Peter G. Schultz

Endosymbiotic theory suggests that mitochondria evolved from free-living prokaryotes which entered the host cell and were retained as endosymbionts. Here, we model this earliest stage of the endosymbiotic theory of mitochondrial evolution by engineering endosymbiosis between two genetically tractable model organisms, Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Read more

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