Category Archives: SCIENCE

Restoration of biofuel production levels and increased tolerance under ionic liquid stress is enabled by a mutation in the essential Escherichia coli gene cydC

Thomas Eng, Philipp Demling, Robin A. Herbert, Yan Chen, Veronica Benites, Joel Martin, Anna Lipzen, Edward E. K. Baidoo, Lars M. Blank, Christopher J. Petzold, Aindrila Mukhopadhyay

Background

Microbial production of chemicals from renewable carbon sources enables a sustainable route to many bioproducts. Sugar streams, such as those derived from biomass pretreated with ionic liquids (IL), provide efficiently derived and cost-competitive starting materials. A limitation to this approach is that residual ILs in the pretreated sugar source can be inhibitory to microbial growth and impair expression of the desired biosynthetic pathway.

Read more

Engineering yeast endosymbionts as a step toward the evolution of mitochondria

Angad P. MehtaLubica SupekovaJian-Hua ChenKersi PestonjamaspPaul WebsterYeonjin KoScott C. HendersonGerry McDermottFrantisek Supek, and Peter G. Schultz

Endosymbiotic theory suggests that mitochondria evolved from free-living prokaryotes which entered the host cell and were retained as endosymbionts. Here, we model this earliest stage of the endosymbiotic theory of mitochondrial evolution by engineering endosymbiosis between two genetically tractable model organisms, Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Read more

An engineered thermal-shift screen reveals specific lipid preferences of eukaryotic and prokaryotic membrane proteins

Emmanuel Nji, Yurie Chatzikyriakidou, Michael Landreh & David Drew

Membrane bilayers are made up of a myriad of different lipids that regulate the functional activity, stability, and oligomerization of many membrane proteins. Despite their importance, screening the structural and functional impact of lipid–protein interactions to identify specific lipid requirements remains a major challenge. Read more

The artificial cell: biology-inspired compartmentalization of chemical function

Royal Society Publishing has recently published a special issue of Interface Focus entitled “The artificial cell: biology-inspired compartmentalization of chemical function”, organised by Paul A Beales, Barbara Ciani and Stephen Mann.

This issue is based on a Royal Society Theo Murphy meeting held on the 26–27 February 2018. The articles reveal the rich diversity of research currently being undertaken in the field of artificial cell design and construction, and highlight the challenges that lie ahead.

The articles are FREE TO ACCESS here.

Read more

CBMNet scientists identify key step in production of Body Odour

CBMNet-funded scientists from the Universities of York and Oxford, along with industrial partner Unilever, have unravelled a key part of the molecular process by which armpit bacteria produce the most pungent component of the noxious smell we recognise as BO. The findings could result in more effective deodorants with targeted active ingredients, the researchers suggest. Read more

« Older Entries